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bino
05-14-2005, 10:50 AM
little 8x6 cm tin box, focal-lengt 19 mm, pinhole 0,2, f 95
I have this one for one shot in my pocket
I tried it today and it was fun :)
See the first shot :) time 45 sec, paper 7x5, Attached files http://f295.f295.org/uploads/pcket_4108.jpg (http://f295.f295.org/uploads/pcket_4108.jpg) http://f295.f295.org/uploads/maria_6023.jpg (http://f295.f295.org/uploads/maria_6023.jpg)

earlj
05-14-2005, 11:38 AM
Nice camera, bino. Tom Miller has 50 or 60 cameras of a similar size and design that he uses to introduce people to pinhole photography. Nice picture.

bino
05-14-2005, 01:43 PM
Very good to hear that, Earlj. It makes me sure that it will work! In October I will make a workshop with young children and my idea was to use such a small format, so I tried it out. :)

taco
05-14-2005, 05:44 PM
In October I will make a workshop with young children and my idea was to use such a small format, so I tried it out. :)
Bino,
for young children you are indeed better with paper negatives (can be handled under safe light), but for real pocket cameras build something similar to a "pintoid"
http://www.merrillphoto.com/pintoids.htm
taco

willem
05-15-2005, 12:56 AM
nice image Bino

tinman
05-17-2005, 01:10 PM
so, taco, using a pintoid, is the negative simply cut beforehand? Is regular 35mm film used?

taco
05-17-2005, 05:06 PM
so, taco, using a pintoid, is the negative simply cut beforehand? Is regular 35mm film used?
If you had a look on the above mentioned link, the answers are yes and yes. Have a look on this one:
http://www.merrillphoto.com/Pintoids/ptpool.jpg
Definitevely standard 35 mm film precut
taco

ImageMaker
05-17-2005, 09:55 PM
There's an article on APUG about using 2x3 format sheet film in a Pintoid (not to mention using the same tin as a monobath processing tank). Apparently the 2x3 sheet film just nicely catches by the corners in the rounded corners of the tin; that gives a much larger negative and wider angle of view than a 35 mm, and doesn't require installing album corners or similar devices to retain the film.

You can buy 2x3 sheet film from J&C Photo -- currently in stock in ISO 50, 100, and 200, though I think I've seen 25 and 400 as well, and pretty reasonably priced (even compared to major brand 120 roll film).

Josh
06-12-2005, 01:10 PM
It would be interesting to know if anyone on the forum has converted a subminiature camera into a pinhole.

This is a gallery of Justin Quinell's photographs taken from inside his mouth. Bizarre.
http://www.pinholephotography.org/Mouth1%20Blank%20mouth.htm

ImageMaker
06-13-2005, 07:44 AM
The big limitation of submini is that the smaller the negative and shorter the focal length, the less resolution you have relative to image size. You surely could convert a HIT type submini with little effort (much more work to put usable film into it than to convert the camera), and the resulting images would likely be better than what many of those cameras produce with the original lens (many/most are simply dreadful, make a Holga look like professional equipment), but the end result would still be pretty fuzzy -- not least because it would require considerable magnification to view at all. The more you magnify, the worse it looks, generally. Even with the .007" pinhole that's optimum for a 20 mm focal length, such a small negative (14x14 mm, in the case of a HIT) will just look fuzzy by the time you make it big enough to view.

Other subminis are worse -- my Minolta 16 cameras have a 10x14 mm negative, and a Minox negative is 8x11 mm (and you might well receive death threats from some circles if you were to convert a Minox to pinhole). Just making a common 4x6 inch print from a Minox negative requires enlarging about 13x, which brings the .006" minimum circle of confusion up to .079" in the print -- and that's a LOT of blur. By comparison, a contact print from a 9x12 cm negative shot with a .018" pinhole has just .018" circle of confusion, and still doesn't look really sharp.