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unrealalex
04-16-2006, 11:35 AM
Good day,

Here is the frame that I made not so long ago:
http://rsdn.ru/File/5461/19.jpg

I decided to create this frame after I've started multi layer gum bichromate processes. It's necessary, as you know, to register negative and the paper for each layer. It's also possible to do it by hands but you may make a mistake and the print will be damaged.
I've searched forums and sites and found some decisions. So having combined them together I got this one.

Advantages:
1. Fast manufacturing
2. Low cost
3. Comfort use (imho :) )
4. Registration of a negative(s)

Disadvantages:
Not found yet (imho ;) )

So, if you want to build such frame you need:

Materials:

1. Plywood: 230x300x16 mm
http://files.rsdn.ru/5461/01.jpg

2. Balk: 25x25 mm
http://rsdn.ru/File/5461/02.jpg

3. Black mat sticky wide type
http://rsdn.ru/File/5461/03.jpg

4. Four bolts for legs
http://rsdn.ru/File/5461/04.jpg

5. Thin glass: 230x275x2 mm
http://rsdn.ru/File/5461/05.jpg

6. Two identical punchers
http://rsdn.ru/File/5461/06.jpg

7. Seven clips (the biggest size)
http://rsdn.ru/File/5461/07.jpg

8. Two hooks
http://rsdn.ru/File/5461/20.jpg

Tools:

1. Drill
2. Hammer
3. Glue

Steps:
1. Disassembly first puncher and extract punch cylinders
http://rsdn.ru/File/5461/08.jpg

2. Drill two holes in balk:
- diameter of each hole equal to the punch cylinder diameter
- distance between holes equal to the distance between cylinders in a puncher
- depth of holes equals a half of cylinder length

Cover bulk side that has drilled holes with black type.
http://rsdn.ru/File/5461/09.jpg

* This bulk will serve as a negative-paper clip

3. Drill four holes for the leags on one side of the plywood and install legs (bolts)
http://rsdn.ru/File/5461/10.jpg

4. Drill two holes on the other side of plywood
- diameter of each hole equal to the punch cylinder diameter
- distance between holes equal to the distance between cylinders in a puncher
- distance from the edge of polywood equal 12.5 mm
- depth of holes equals a half of cylinder length

Cover polywood side that has drilled holes with black type and install cylinders
http://rsdn.ru/File/5461/12.jpg

5. Screw two hooks on the both sides of polywood.
http://rsdn.ru/File/5461/11.jpg

Frame ready
http://rsdn.ru/File/5461/13.jpg


Usage

1. Use the second (alive) puncher to punch two holes in a negative, or in a film, which it is typed to a negative
http://files.rsdn.ru/5461/15.jpg

2. Then in a paper
http://files.rsdn.ru/5461/14.jpg

3. First put the paper with emulsion
http://files.rsdn.ru/5461/16.jpg

4. Then a negative
http://files.rsdn.ru/5461/17.jpg

5. After that put the bulk and close the hooks
http://files.rsdn.ru/5461/18.jpg

6. Put the glass over the negative and press all together by clips
http://files.rsdn.ru/5461/19.jpg

That's All.

P.S.
Of course you may use this frame without registration system. Take off balk and cylinders and use the frame.

Good luck.

ImageMaker
04-16-2006, 12:24 PM
Nice work, Alex! That looks like it would cost about $20 to make, if you buy the punches new at an office supply store (get 'em at Costco, might save $5) and can't scrounge glass from a thrift store picture frame (though if there's a glass shop handy, it probably costs no more to buy a loose pane to size than it would to buy a used picture frame from Goodwill, and you run less risk of finding a scratch after you get it home and clean it). For comparison, commercially made registration punches and frames cost upwards of $400, well used...

Is the black matt you used a sort of rubber foam? That would be like Foamies material that can be gotten at craft stores in the USA, for a dollar or two per sheet (bigger than 8x10 inches, comes in plain or sticky back).

I do have a question, though -- if using original camera negatives (shot with filters or in a tri-color camera, for instance), how would you go about applying a strip to each negative for the punch that would keep them in register without unwanted cropping from punching the image area?

earlj
04-16-2006, 01:14 PM
I do have a question, though -- if using original camera negatives (shot with filters or in a tri-color camera, for instance), how would you go about applying a strip to each negative for the punch that would keep them in register without unwanted cropping from punching the image area?

It is going to be necessary to put some tape on the negative to accomplish this. If you have some inkjet transparency film, you could tape a 1/2" (1cm) wide strip to the side of the negative, with the tape on the side opposite the emulsion. For that matter, the strip with the registration holes does not have to be transparent at all - any sheet that is about the same thickness as the film should work. There could not be very much tape on the negative edge without encroaching on the image, so the tape joint will not be super strong, but it should work.

unrealalex
04-16-2006, 01:38 PM
Thank you!

Earl, I totally agree with you. I do not try this method in practice because I have no LF camera. But I've founding description of this method at many alternative photograpy forums and sites (main is alt. process mailing list archive).

ImageMaker, the material that I use is Velvet foil: http://www.alkor-deco.de/englisch/klespe_vel_e.html

gneissgirl
04-16-2006, 04:18 PM
Thank you for a very clearly documented procedure! This is a valuable contribution. Even I would be able to do this (when I am ready for more than 1 color) ;D

unrealalex
04-16-2006, 05:12 PM
You may use registration system not only for multi color / negatives.

With registration system you can:
1. Correct underexposed prints by making a second layer
2. With gum bichromate make multilayer print with one negative to achieve more details and tonale scale
3. Combine some processes. Van Dyke over Cyanotype, Gum over Platinum, etc.

staft
04-16-2006, 06:18 PM
nicely done, alex- a great system, and excellent documentation. when i used to make stone lithographs, we used registration pins that could be glued to a flat surface, and fit holes made with a common hole punch. have you ever tried them for photo printing?

ImageMaker
04-16-2006, 07:22 PM
My concern with taping a strip onto a negative was registration errors from one negative to the next on tri-color work. Putting the same negative back into the frame, tiny errors in cutting the strip or getting it perfectly aligned on the negative won't matter, but for tri-color, the three negatives all have to line up. I suppose one could use an oversize registration sheet with corner marks on it, punch and mount the strip, and then line up the negative with great care before applying the tape. Short of registering the film before putting it into the camera (which has its own limitations), this is probably the best you'll get.

Of course, I still need to work on being able to change film holders without moving the camera so much as to "recompose" the image from one film to the next...

earlj
04-16-2006, 09:21 PM
IM - If you have multiple negatives, then they almost certainly would have been made from one parent - either photographically or with software. In either case, you can include optical registration targets outside the image area on the parent image to line things up. If I were making separation negatives from a color transparency or negative, I would add register targets outside each of the four corners of the image and include them on each separation neg. Then you can line up all three optically with the aid of a loupe and punch them all at the same time.

If you are making in-camera separations with separate shots, you will not be able to make perfect registration no matter how much voodoo you can muster. But that will part of the joy of in-camera separations, will it not?

buggy
04-17-2006, 05:04 PM
Nice frame. You are very imaginative to come up with this frame. You should market this frame on this and other forums such as APUG.

Marv
04-17-2006, 11:07 PM
Thanks for the tutorial. This answers a lot of questions I had as to constructiing a pin register. You are an inventor after all of our hearts. Thanks again!