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Thread: Exposure Experiments

  1. #1

    Exposure Experiments

    Here we are with recent exposure experiments.
    What I was striving for here was a very quiet tonal scale. I wanted to see how quiet it could get before I approached underexposure. I metered and placed the high values in this exercise and set aside thinking about the low values during the session.
    Thanks again Earl and Marv for encouraging me to experiment.

    Leaf: 60 second exposure at f216. Zero45, T669 w/ 405 back, 60 second development.


    Orchid #1: 90 second exposure at f216. Zero45, T669 w/ 405 back, 60 second development.


    Orchid #2: 102 second exposure at f216. Zero45, T669 w/ 405 back, 60 second development.


    Orchid #3: 95 second exposure at f216. Zero45, T669 w/ 405 back, 60 second development.

  2. #2

    Exposure Experiments

    For me these all work really well, Laura. I have had this type of experiment on my list of things to do for some time. This gives me a lot of motivation to move it up the list. The quietness you talk about is most definitely there and the restricted tonal range raises this work way above similar images with a full tonal scale. I especially like the first which takes the restriction to its full extent. The languor of the atmosphere created is almost palpable. Have you seen the landscape work of Thomas Joshua Cooper? He is a master of this type of approach.

    Mark

  3. #3

    Exposure Experiments

    There is certainly alot of information to be analyzed Laura. I hope the exercise met your expectations in that respect. Testing and experimenting can get a bit tiring(boring) and tedious but the benefits are, well, you don't have to do it again!

    Not that you asked.....but....

    For my money, I find Orchid #1 comes closest to what I would envision as the "correct" (read what I would strive for) tonal range. Delicate textured whites and deep but open shadows. Deep but open.....sounds like an oxymoron doesn't it? But it works if everything comes togehter. I would fine tune the exposure to get the white on the very edge of blowing out, in fact, to look right in a print I doubt it will ever look good on a monitor. In traditional wet side printing the difference of one second of exposure can push the high values over the edge or drop them into murky grey, it's that close.

    Thanks for sharing your results. I hope our encouragment helps.

  4. #4

    Exposure Experiments

    Quote Originally Posted by monophoto
    For me these all work really well, Laura. I have had this type of experiment on my list of things to do for some time. This gives me a lot of motivation to move it up the list. The quietness you talk about is most definitely there and the restricted tonal range raises this work way above similar images with a full tonal scale. I especially like the first which takes the restriction to its full extent. The languor of the atmosphere created is almost palpable. Have you seen the landscape work of Thomas Joshua Cooper? He is a master of this type of approach.

    Mark
    Hi Mark,
    Thank you for your comment. The experiment was most enjoyable, enhancing my understanding of pinhole work. I also enjoyed taking more thorough notes, and then looking back on them later as I examined the photographs. I'm happy to hear you enjoyed seeing the first image. During the session this subject was my personal favorite. I had the chance last night to look at Cooper's work and plan to revisit his images for further study. Beautiful! Thank you for pointing me to his work. -- Laura

  5. #5

    Exposure Experiments

    Quote Originally Posted by Marv
    There is certainly alot of information to be analyzed Laura. I hope the exercise met your expectations in that respect. Testing and experimenting can get a bit tiring(boring) and tedious but the benefits are, well, you don't have to do it again!

    Not that you asked.....but....

    For my money, I find Orchid #1 comes closest to what I would envision as the "correct" (read what I would strive for) tonal range. Delicate textured whites and deep but open shadows. Deep but open.....sounds like an oxymoron doesn't it? But it works if everything comes togehter. I would fine tune the exposure to get the white on the very edge of blowing out, in fact, to look right in a print I doubt it will ever look good on a monitor. In traditional wet side printing the difference of one second of exposure can push the high values over the edge or drop them into murky grey, it's that close.

    Thanks for sharing your results. I hope our encouragment helps.
    Hi Marv,
    The experiment was most enjoyable. I'm looking forward to making the transition to sheet film. It makes sense to make the transition now since the future of instant film seems uncertain. I shifted gears since my last post about film/developer combinations and have decided to test T-Max 100 developed in Phil Davis' DI#13 using the BTZS tubes. I'm really interested in seeing what that combination can do in relation to the type of tonal scale I want to achieve.
    I agree with you about Orchid #1. Blowing out the edge really would have added more snap to the tonal range, creating an interesting edge effect against the dark background.
    The encouragement and feedback on this forum is most helpful. Thank you for your insights! -- Laura

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