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Thread: View from Fort Snelling

  1. #1
    500+ Posts earlj's Avatar
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    View from Fort Snelling

    This image was captured with my new 8x10 plywood camera. I rested the camera on a concrete wall on the East side of the Fort Snelling compound. We are looking North, up the Mississippi River. Can you see the skyline of downtown Minneapolis in the center of the frame? I have some learning to do about what the dynamic range of black and white film really is. This image was a bit underexposed for the shadow areas. I think that the detail is good in the highlights - my scanner is not the best. All in all, I am very happy with the camera.

    8x10 plywood camera
    120 mm, .400 mm aperture, f300
    Efke PL100 film, 35 seconds exposure
    HC-110 dil. H, 11 minutes
    scanned (and stitched) from the negative Attached files

  2. #2
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    View from Fort Snelling

    Nice! Stitched...? Small scanner?

  3. #3

    View from Fort Snelling

    Very nice Earl. If this is stitched it is very hard to tell it. My new scanner does not do 4X5, so I will find myself in the same situation.

  4. #4
    500+ Posts earlj's Avatar
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    View from Fort Snelling

    My scanner is an Epson 3200 - it has a 4x5 setup, so it can scan a little more than 1/3 of an 8x10. The light area in the lid is about 4 inches x 9 inches or so. I don't have a film holder for 8x10 for the scanner, so I have to put the negative directly on the glass, which causes newton ring issues, and makes it hard to line up (there needs to be that gap at the top for the scanner to calibrate). I will be getting a new V700 scanner soon that can do 8x10's, so this is only a temporary situation.

  5. #5

    View from Fort Snelling

    I went with the V500 Earl and love it. Of course I wish I had the V700, but that will come in time. I know you will love the V700.
    Regards

  6. #6
    500+ Posts Isis's Avatar
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    View from Fort Snelling

    You know the old saying, expose for the shadows, develop for the highlights. But there properly more in the negative that the scanner is just blocking up. The V700 should help with some of that.

  7. #7
    500+ Posts earlj's Avatar
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    View from Fort Snelling

    Here's the final image (I shot four sheets of film, but I had a dark slide accident on one sheet). I think that this one turned out best, although I need to reduce the amount of sky in images like this. This one has visible stitch lines.

    This poses an interesting topic for speculation - I think that pinhole does not do this type of image well. I think that with a vast landscape and small details, a sharper lens-based image works better. There isn't much here to recommend pinhole except for the wide angle.

    8x10 plywood camera
    120 mm, .400 mm aperture, f300
    Efke PL100 film, 35 seconds exposure
    HC-110 dil. H, 11 minutes
    scanned (and stitched) from the negative Attached files

  8. #8

    View from Fort Snelling

    Talking about (2247.jgp) think looming foreground Earl. I have the same issue, primarily with he 8X10, of getting too much sky-grass-what ever. Viewing on the ground glass (8X10 is a lens format for me) helps to pre-visualize the end product but being forewarned of the issue is the first step to overcoming it.

    The greatest advantage of wide angle pinhole is the tremendous depth of field (like you don't know this already) and ability to encompass foreground features that are difficult if not impossible with a wide angle lens on 8X10. Try dropping down a bit and pointing the camera down and getting closer to all of the detail in the snow at the bottom. Suddenly the river, trees and that elusive city sky line become a very interesting element in the overall image. Lots of neat abstract shapes and textures in the snow balanced by the background image that is very far from abstract.

    2247.jgp certainly looks well (exposed-scanned) and if you are lacking any shadow detail it doesn't hurt the image. I think when you get a better scanner it will become apparent that there are ways to pull detail out of the shadows you never realized were possible. I have had very good luck with the 4990, the only exception being very over exposed highlights. Just like silver printing a block high light is just that; blocked.

    All that and a big ass negative...pretty neat huh?

  9. #9
    500+ Posts earlj's Avatar
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    View from Fort Snelling

    Quote Originally Posted by 1253
    Suddenly the river, trees and that elusive city sky line become a very interesting element in the overall image. Lots of neat abstract shapes and textures in the snow balanced by the background image that is very far from abstract.
    . . .

    All that and a big ass negative...pretty neat huh?
    Good advice, Marv. And yeah, I think that I like big negatives. I hope that they make nice carbon prints (but why wouldn't they?). I think that I 'see' in pinhole pretty well, but my efforts to characterize the river are stretching my comfort zone. I hope that I am able to make interesting images while I show what makes this part of the river special.

    For anyone thinking about trying Efke PL100, based on (4) 4x5 images and (4) 8x10 images - go for it. I think that it is good stuff.

  10. #10

    View from Fort Snelling

    I'd suggest that you not let your eye be limited by "found" camera supports. You need a tripod that will allow the low camera position Marv suggests. And maybe get a bit closer to the river itself.

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