Using the Scanner to Plan for Silver Printing at Peters Valley Craft Center
Bruce Byers
August 26-30, 2011

In today’s world the darkroom is a thing of the past unless you began photography when that's how you created photographic images. With computers, editing and organizing your negatives has become a lot easier. Come prepared with processed film to be scanned. You will scan the whole roll at one time into the computer. With photoshop you will then be able to cut up the contact sheet and edit what you want to print. Instead of tiny print on a photo contact sheet you can enlarge your contact to the size of your computer screen. This allows you to edit with more ease. Once you have your edit we will go into the darkroom and print. Bruce will show you how to pull the best from your negative. Once everyone has completed one darkroom session, making work prints, we will talk about our choices and determine how to make our final prints.

Intermediate - Advanced
Please visit http://www.petersvalley.org for registration details & costs

Bruce Byers has been shooting since he received his first camera at 9 years old. He fell in love with being able to capture what he saw, on film. In the years 73 to 77 he studied photography at RIT in Rochester NY. He also would work in NYC with different photographers through my college years which gave him a great window into the workings of photography. Bruce Byers has spent over 35 years perfecting the art of observing. With a wealth of professional experience matched with a sensitive eye, Byers captures his observations photographically with evocative results. The images reflect a range of emotions, immersing the viewer in a world of private moments that most of us would otherwise miss. Unstaged and unstructured, these images reflect spontaneous moments of introspection, isolation, joy, serenity and playfulness. The genuine feelings communicated in Byers work represent the true spirit of life in its everyday guise. Byers has traveled all over the world preserving his observations on film. He explains, "I am intrigued by the emotional power of an individual's private reveries, typically unobserved by the outside world."