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Thread: tripod for LF camera?

  1. #1

    tripod for LF camera?

    hey large format people, i need to come up with some way to support my big, bulky scanner camera. i have had light pinholes rip out epoxied-in-place bushings, so i don't see that as a solution. any way to make a big support plate stable on a tripod? is my 1/4" screw ok, or does it need to be 3/8?

  2. #2

    tripod for LF camera?

    They make a "bushing" that is threaded on the inside for 1/4 or 3/8 and has aggressive wood screw threads on the out side. One end has a slot for a flat blade screw driver and the other is flat. You drill a hole and screw them in.

    The other is a threaded tube that has a flange on one end. Some have stakes that drive in the wood, some have holes in the flange for screws. If you put them in with the flange opposite the tripod head the flange acts as a large washer and prevents pulling out. The tubes are sometimes a little short and you need to countersink the hole to accomidate the flange.

    With these you would literally have to break the base of the camera to get them to pull through. Any good hardware store or wood working supply has them.

    If your tripod has a 3/8 screw I would opt for the larger size. An ounce of prevention don't you know.....

  3. #3

    tripod for LF camera?

    thanks, marv- the ones i have pulled out were the agressively-toothed variety, but it didn't occur to me to put it on the inside. doh!

    do i need a larger-than-normal plate on the tripod, too?

  4. #4

    tripod for LF camera?

    When I went to 8X10 I did get a different head that has a bigger plate. I used a Bogen 3050 and didn't have any problems but I wanted something a bit more substantial and went to a 3057. The 3057 has about a 4X4 plate.

    The 3050 plate works with the 3057 so I didn't have to replate all my cameras but I have the larger plate on the 8X10. I guess it's your call.

    Nice avatar by the way!!!!!!!

  5. #5

    tripod for LF camera?

    Quote Originally Posted by Marv
    They make a "bushing" that is threaded on the inside for 1/4 or 3/8 and has aggressive wood screw threads on the out side. One end has a slot for a flat blade screw driver and the other is flat. You drill a hole and screw them in.

    The other is a threaded tube that has a flange on one end. Some have stakes that drive in the wood, some have holes in the flange for screws. If you put them in with the flange opposite the tripod head the flange acts as a large washer and prevents pulling out. The tubes are sometimes a little short and you need to countersink the hole to accomidate the flange.

    With these you would literally have to break the base of the camera to get them to pull through. Any good hardware store or wood working supply has them.

    If your tripod has a 3/8 screw I would opt for the larger size. An ounce of prevention don't you know.....
    The flanged bushings are known as T-nuts. The other bushings, with the agressive wood threads, hold better when epoxied as well as screwed in place. I routinely use a 5x7 flatbed camera held on the 3" diameter top of my Tiltall tripod with a 1/4" screw. If a tripod has too small a top surface to support the camera, one can make an adaptor of plywood with a T-nut to hold it to the tripod and a hole and screw for attaching the camera. I wouldn't trust quick detachable plates for this use.

  6. #6
    500+ Posts earlj's Avatar
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    tripod for LF camera?

    Steven:

    Joe VanCleave posted a discussion of large camera tripods in the f295 Camera Making forum:

    http://f295.f295.org/uploads/Blah.pl?b-cm/m-1131944890/

    He has some elegant designs that he constructed himself.

  7. #7

    tripod for LF camera?

    wonderful link, earl- how did this one get by me? joe has inspired me to approach this from the ground up- lighter is better, especially when you already have a 3' camera and laptop!

  8. #8
    Administrator Tom Persinger's Avatar
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    tripod for LF camera?

    how about a shelf on the bottom (between the three legs) to hold the laptop?

  9. #9

    tripod for LF camera?

    exactly what i was thinking, tom- maybe a dark cloth integrated over the screen somehow. or a hermetically sealed, sandproof radiation containment shield so i can go back to the beach...

  10. #10

    tripod for LF camera?

    I was just gonna look up my "Tripods, Tripods, Tripods" link and repost it, but thanks to Earl for finding it.

    Just a brief update on the tripods in that post. My 5x8 format aluminum box camera proved to be very light. Great for carrying it around, but vulnerable to the wind. And the bottom plate of the camera is rather flimsy, so the camera would shake in the kinds of wind one encounters when doing landscape shooting in the American southwest (like right now, for instance).

    So I've begun an "upgrade" to the aluminum boxcam (with pictures still pending). But a brief description. I attached a 3/4" thick sheet of plywood to the camera bottom, using 8/32 hardware. This rectangle of plywood is hinged, using a brass door hinge, to another identical sheet of plywood, which has an epoxied 1/4-20 blind nut, for attachment to a tripod. The bottom plate attaches to a tripod, and the camera is permanently attached to the hinged top plate.

    These two hinged plates allow the camera to be tilted up and down. My homemade tripods allow "some" lateral and fore/aft tilting, by adjusting the legs, but its mainly designed to permit adjusting of the legs so the head is level. This new tilt feature expands the usefullness of my tripod design, while maintaining the light weight.

    I've fashioned two aluminum support strips, with adjustment holes and removable pins, to the sides of the wooden plates, permitting the hinged plates to be locked into one of a dozen or so tilt positions.

    As I indicated earlier, I'll post images of the new setup when completed.

    The tall, wooden tripod used with the 5x8 boxcam will elevate the pinhole to a height > 6' off the ground, and the tripod weighs in much less than my Bogen.

    Obviously, one wouldn't want to cart this rig through an airport, but for road trips, it works just fine, and'll fit into most any vehicle.

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