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Thread: Recycling

  1. #11
    500+ Posts colray's Avatar
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    Very neat.

  2. #12
    Great project, David. It is inspiring the way you've mated an old camera to a paper negative box, bringing new life to old. I agree with you about these old lenses being good for paper, they being low contrast helps tame the paper a bit. Looking forward to more images.

    ~Joe
    "There was just that moment and now there's this moment and in between there is nothing. Photography, in a way, is the negation of chronology."-Geoff Dyer, "The Ongoing Moment"
    My Writing Blog: Joe Van Cleave's Blog
    My Pinhole Blog: Obscure Camera
    Visit my F295 Gallery

  3. #13
    Those are beautiful little cameras that made great photos in thier day. Looks like to have breathed new life in to one to make great photos in our day.....
    "Most people know the names of only two photographers. One is Ansel Adams and the other one isn't." Bill Jay
    See Tales from the Dark Slide in the Gallery section.

  4. #14
    Excellent conversion. The lenses of these old cameras have their own charm.
    -_- Best wishes from Switzerland, René -_- my photos on flickr

  5. #15
    500+ Posts Ned.Lewis's Avatar
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    I love shooting paper negatives in old Kodak folding cameras. I've got two Kodak No. 1A Jr Autographics that used 116 film and a 3A series ii that used 122 "postcard format" film. I cut the paper so that it fits over the film gate and just lay it inside and close the back. Then I juggle two envelops in my changing bag, one for exposed paper and one for unexposed. I pre-flash like I learned from Joe VanCleave's posts here on f295... actually that's what brought me to this site in the first place! The 116 size, I think, is the smallest size that still makes really decent contact prints.

    One of mine has really leaky bellows, so I just keep the whole thing inside a black tee shirt ( which has written on it "What is the speed of dark?" ) and pull the lens out through an arm hole! I've also been cutting sheet film down to fit in these cameras and using it "one shot". I built a special negative carrier for my enlarger to try to print the 122 size negatives... and am still learning how to do that.

    Those old uncoated lenses along with the "orthographic" look of paper make wonderful atmospheric photographs. For me it all started with finding one of the cameras in our garage ( it was my wife's grandmother's camera ). And that began a longer journey... to go and look at photos from around 1860-1920 or so in the museum and realize that they have a feel and a density of air that we don't see in photography anymore.... and that we very much do see when we look at the world around us with our eyes. I think in some ways the preternaturally clear crisp modern photography with UV filters and coated lenses and UV-blocking film layers is artificial. The real world is full of haze and atmosphere and air, and it contains lots of light... we live our lives within it! Aerial perspective is not something we see much in photography, but we use it ourselves and it is an old idea ( at least as far back as Leonardo ).

    That is a great conversion you did and I love the little slot to make changing paper easier. Nicely done! I would love to see more of your results.

  6. #16
    500+ Posts DaCh's Avatar
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    2A_011sepia.jpg
    Ned, I guess this is the type of image you are talking about.
    This was a couple of days ago, a very dull grey day so I did not use a filter.
    Ilford Multigrade, scanned, inverted and toned in PS.
    Apart from the modern car it looks more like 1913 than 2013.
    The bellows on my 2A had holes at every bend and fold; I cleaned them with solvent and then used electrical tape to make them light tight once again. The tape is very flexible and moulds to the bellows folds surprisingly easily. It does not stick that well so I add a strip of double sided tape along each edge and it has been working well for a month now, lets see how long it lasts.
    Does light still exist if we're not looking?

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/dach_art/

  7. #17
    500+ Posts Ned.Lewis's Avatar
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    Yes! That's wonderful. And when you make one with a little more distance in it, especially in bright sunlight, you'll almost be able to see the air. Also, in some pictures there is a special kind of glow, like the air itself is lit from within. I've seen it on paper negatives and on photos with uncoated glass on paper and film. I'm not sure but I think it's from UV. Maybe someone else here knows what I mean and what causes it. Doesn't really matter the cause... it's a special look.

    I bought some "liquid electrical tape", but haven't tried it yet. The tee shirt trick works as long as I'm careful.

  8. #18
    Black gaffer's tape is good for patching bellows. Be sure to get the real thing, not black masking tape sold in hardware stores, or black duct tape, but the kind used in film and video production.

    In fact, I've made a homemade bellows from thick black scrapbook paper, the pattern drawn directly onto it using ballpoint pen to score the paper for folding, and all the hill and valley creases reinforced by strips of 3/4" wide black gaffer's tape.

    ~Joe
    "There was just that moment and now there's this moment and in between there is nothing. Photography, in a way, is the negation of chronology."-Geoff Dyer, "The Ongoing Moment"
    My Writing Blog: Joe Van Cleave's Blog
    My Pinhole Blog: Obscure Camera
    Visit my F295 Gallery

  9. #19
    500+ Posts Ned.Lewis's Avatar
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    Thanks Joe, I need to get a roll of real cloth gaffer's tape -- lots of uses it seems!

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