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Thread: LIght Pipe Array Camera

  1. #31
    500+ Posts Ned.Lewis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeVanCleave View Post
    I'll probably need a few more packs of straws.
    That made me laugh. I can see how it's true, but seeing that photo and then having you post this comment is pretty funny. Maybe you could cut them in half to double the number... Good luck with this cool project!
    Some photos: Ipernity
    ( pinholes and solargraphs mixed in among the rest)

  2. #32
    That's awesome Joe. Keep it going. Following our last chat about this pixelator stuff I was curious and went and made a 6x6cm pixel array (about 20x20) with these same straws (3mm), I cut the staws to about 6mm in length using a little jig I made to keep the length. The screen was a simple sanded piece of perspex and I shot it in a holga. The results are very rough, seeing as i only used a 20x20 grid. It worked well though...I must dig out the negatives. Making the grid was time consuming but after I cut 400 6mm lengths I dipped each mini-pipe in glue (I was able to hold them on the end of a small screw-driver) and assembled them together.

  3. #33
    That's awesome, Jimmy. I'd like to see a photo of your design, plus a scan of the image. I'm interested in how other people besides myself take and adapt this concept. I especially like your idea of using shorter straws, and a diffuser screen. Great stuff.

    ~Joe

    Edit: Okay, I can see where it's easy to confuse the Pixellator idea with the Light Pipe Array idea, as the one originated from the other. The Pixellator requires a lens of some sort (pinhole or otherwise) to project a coherent image onto a translucent screen, behind which an array of short cells which average the illumination in each area into a grid of pixels, directly in front of the film plane. Whereas the LPA dispenses with the image projection screen and lens entirely, instead directly forming a grid of pixel-like spots on the film due to each light pipe's restricted (and unique) angle of view and light-averaging properties.

    Still, I'd like to see your implementation of the Pixellator idea, Jimmy.
    Last edited by JoeVanCleave; 08-15-2013 at 03:41 PM.
    "There was just that moment and now there's this moment and in between there is nothing. Photography, in a way, is the negation of chronology."-Geoff Dyer, "The Ongoing Moment"
    My Writing Blog: Joe Van Cleave's Blog
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  4. #34
    Hey Joe, I have the images scanned and I will upload tomorrow. We have no internet at home at the moment for some reason! I've been without it for a week and must say the break has done me good! (here using free internet while my car is having it's "controle technique")

  5. #35
    Ok, here's the pics..(all your original ideas here joe, though using the straws was mine!)
    I really like the 3d effect, and the non roundness of the cells - the imperfections allows "the hand" to be seen.

    I'd be interested to see this working in colour...sadly I've no colour 120 at the moment.

    the camera..
    DSC_0096.jpg

    Self portrait..
    20130814007s.jpg

    My shadow..
    20130814011s.jpg

  6. #36
    500+ Posts earlj's Avatar
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    These are very cool images, Jimmy! Thanks for sharing!
    because:
    "a squid eating dough in a polyethylene bag is fast and bulbous, got me?"
    -Don Van Vliet

  7. #37
    Hey, that's very neat, Jimmy. Color would be fun, would it not?

    Myself, I've started work on an 8x10 Light Pipe Array camera. I took the rear half out of my old sliding box camera and built a cardboard and foamcore insert that I'm now in the process of installing the straws into. The rear half has an insert for sheet film holders, while the array insert will permit me to experiment with various distances between the rear of the array and the film plane.

    I tried using CA glue, but it does not adhere well to the plastic. Now I found plastic model cement, with a small applicator tip, and it works very well. I use two wooden sticks cut to length that fit snugly across the width of the insert to hold the straws into place during installation, and I install one tier of straws at a time under the sticks, then apply glue in the gaps between the straws and let them cure. Now I just need to put in the time to finish building it. I plan on building a nesting front half that has a barn door-type of shutter, for exposure control. This will permit me to use the film back with both the box camera and the Light Pipe Array camera.
    "There was just that moment and now there's this moment and in between there is nothing. Photography, in a way, is the negation of chronology."-Geoff Dyer, "The Ongoing Moment"
    My Writing Blog: Joe Van Cleave's Blog
    My Pinhole Blog: Obscure Camera
    Visit my F295 Gallery

  8. #38
    500+ Posts Ned.Lewis's Avatar
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    There are subtle repeated patterns and symmetries of the images within each "straw". That is really neat. Especially in the self portrait!
    Some photos: Ipernity
    ( pinholes and solargraphs mixed in among the rest)

  9. #39
    I think it's high time for an update to the "Light Pipe Array" camera project. As you might recall, our hero was last seen attempting to piece together enough black plastic coffee stir straws to make an array big enough to cover 8"x10", or thereabouts. After several weeks of scouring the local Target stores, I was able to purchase enough of the same brand of straws to proceed. I've lost count, but I think it was about 35 packs of the Diamond-brand straws. I'm almost certain there were some marketing people scratching their heads, wondering what the sudden run of black stir sticks is all about.

    I had initially been engrossed with the idea of a parallel pipe array, where all the straws are clustered together in a parallel bunch, pointing in essentially the same direction. So off I started, against my better judgement. I had made a frame of thin cardboard within which to mount these straws. It was essentially a box without front or back, within which I started arranging the straws in layers, from the bottom up. I initially was very careful about their placement, and would use superglue (CA-based) in an attempt to keep them more orderly, but found that CA glue does not adhere readily to this type of plastic.

    Next, I tried plastic model cement, but it too didn't adhere all that well, plus represented a much longer curing time.

    I ended up deciding that I'd just dispense with carefully constructing this prototype, and instead just heaped the straws into the box-like enclosure, relying on their mutual pressure to keep them neatly arranged and tightly packed, which did work as expected.

    The rear (film plane) end of the straws I ensured were flat against a panel I used for that purpose, then I enclosed the whole affair in a larger box (taken from an older pinhole camera), with a sheet of photo paper as a negative, sandwiched tightly against the end of the array.

    The resulting image was essentially nothing except the backgroung "noise" of each straw's individual light transmission properties; no identifiable image could be made out.

    You might be interested to know how to "shutter" the exposure of such a camera. I place the array into a larger pinhole box camera that has a rear lid that removes for access; the grid is pointing backwards, toward the rear lid, which I swiftly remove and reinstall to manage the exposure. The pinhole aperture in this outer enclosure box is not used; rather, the box's rear lid is used as the shutter.

    Subsequent pondering has me convinced that the "focus" of this array is essentially directly at the front end of the array itself, as if you could put a flat object directly against the front of the tubes and get an identifiable image, but nothing from further away.

    So, I then decided that what I need is a slightly diverging array, but not as severely diverging as the smaller 3"x3" prototype. I've decided on an array with a 30 degree angle of view, such that it forms a rectangular cone with the tubes tightly packed at the rear film-plane to an 8"x10" size, and the front ends of the tubes forming a looser grid that's several inches large all around. Since I don't have a premanufactured grid with which to support the front ends of the tubes (like I did with the 3"x3" array using craft store sewing mesh of 1/8" grid spacing), I'd have to make my own grid.

    So I've been (very intermittently) working on a front grid, made into thin cardboard using a 1/8" round hole puncher. Since the hole puncher has a reach of only about an inch or so, I've had to cut the cardboard panel (after it was marked with grid lines) into thin strips. I'm now almost done with punching the thousands of holes into these strips (while sitting in front of the TV), and then will be ready to glue them back together into one contiguous grid panel.

    I've already fashioned a wooden frame that the front grid panel will be attached to. After that, more frames to hold the front and rear panels together, then I can start building the array itself by populating the grid with plastic tubes.

    I realize that a picture is worth (at least) a thousand words, and that I have no pictures yet to share of the build process, but will do so soon enough. Stay tuned.

    ~Joe
    Last edited by JoeVanCleave; 11-09-2013 at 02:49 PM.
    "There was just that moment and now there's this moment and in between there is nothing. Photography, in a way, is the negation of chronology."-Geoff Dyer, "The Ongoing Moment"
    My Writing Blog: Joe Van Cleave's Blog
    My Pinhole Blog: Obscure Camera
    Visit my F295 Gallery

  10. #40
    Couldn't you just use a larger sewing mesh panel, skipping holes, for the front?

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