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Thread: Instant Box Camera Project

  1. #21
    Here's the lens hood, made from Fujifilm Instax Wide dark slides, taped together with gaffers tape. It fits snugly in the lens board frame, held in place via an aluminum angle bracket that's double sided taped to the hood and secured to the lens board screw.
    DSCF3233a by jvcabacus, on Flickr

    ~Joe
    "There was just that moment and now there's this moment and in between there is nothing. Photography, in a way, is the negation of chronology."-Geoff Dyer, "The Ongoing Moment"
    My Writing Blog: Joe Van Cleave's Blog
    My Pinhole Blog: Obscure Camera
    Visit my F295 Gallery

  2. #22
    The current shutter is a simple lens cap, made from two-layer square of foam core board taped together, with a recess cut in one layer for the lens. Now that the lens hood is in place, I needed a handle with which to gain access to the lens cap shutter, made from a 35mm film capsule, hot glued to the foam core.

    I'm currently working on an internal, barn door style shutter mechanism, to replace this makeshift lens cap shutter.

    ~Joe

    DSCF3234a by jvcabacus, on Flickr
    "There was just that moment and now there's this moment and in between there is nothing. Photography, in a way, is the negation of chronology."-Geoff Dyer, "The Ongoing Moment"
    My Writing Blog: Joe Van Cleave's Blog
    My Pinhole Blog: Obscure Camera
    Visit my F295 Gallery

  3. #23
    I took the Instant Box Camera out for a field trip today, first into my backyard and then further afield, to several city parks. Despite the wind, dust, pollen and whatnot floating about the spring breeze, the negatives came out fine. No light leaks, no lens flare.

    Up to now, I've been making test images in bright shade, but today's images were all made in bright sun. My lens stops down only to f/32, and my light meter recommended about 1/2 second exposures on most of these, so I did 1 second exposures, about as fast as I can manage while still being fairly accurate. The results are not too bad for being over-exposed, there's still some sky detail faintly visible on several of these.

    These first two are from my backyard:

    Trellis001a by jvcabacus, on Flickr

    Tree&Shed001a by jvcabacus, on Flickr

    While these next three are at or near city parks:

    Park&Tree001a by jvcabacus, on Flickr

    House001a by jvcabacus, on Flickr
    "There was just that moment and now there's this moment and in between there is nothing. Photography, in a way, is the negation of chronology."-Geoff Dyer, "The Ongoing Moment"
    My Writing Blog: Joe Van Cleave's Blog
    My Pinhole Blog: Obscure Camera
    Visit my F295 Gallery

  4. #24
    The last of these three:

    Altura_Park001a by jvcabacus, on Flickr
    "There was just that moment and now there's this moment and in between there is nothing. Photography, in a way, is the negation of chronology."-Geoff Dyer, "The Ongoing Moment"
    My Writing Blog: Joe Van Cleave's Blog
    My Pinhole Blog: Obscure Camera
    Visit my F295 Gallery

  5. #25
    500+ Posts Ned.Lewis's Avatar
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    Joe, those negatives are looking great! Remind me, your ultimate goal is to make positives by using 1:1 copy, right? That's why the box has to be at least twice as long as the focal length of your lens? I guess you can make a fixed "holder" for the developed negative that swings down in front of the camera, and then some way of marking just the right place for your paper holder for use as a copy camera. I think it will be exciting to produce those in situ! It is fun to watch your progress on this!

    It also just occurred to me that if you use the copy camera outside on a bright day, you could have a green filter that would swing down in front of the lens. If you used that for a portion of the copy exposure it could provide very good control of contrast.... assuming you would use VC paper for the positive.

    I wonder if you are already thinking of building one for 8x10!?
    Last edited by Ned.Lewis; 04-01-2015 at 09:50 PM.
    Some photos: Ipernity
    ( pinholes and solargraphs mixed in among the rest)

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Ned.Lewis View Post
    Joe, those negatives are looking great! Remind me, your ultimate goal is to make positives by using 1:1 copy, right? That's why the box has to be at least twice as long as the focal length of your lens? I guess you can make a fixed "holder" for the developed negative that swings down in front of the camera, and then some way of marking just the right place for your paper holder for use as a copy camera. I think it will be exciting to produce those in situ! It is fun to watch your progress on this!

    It also just occurred to me that if you use the copy camera outside on a bright day, you could have a green filter that would swing down in front of the lens. If you used that for a portion of the copy exposure it could provide very good control of contrast.... assuming you would use VC paper for the positive.

    I wonder if you are already thinking of building one for 8x10!?
    Ned, you're correct about when printing 1:1, but the box is plenty long for my longest LF lens, a 150mm binocular objective, where I have at least 300mm of draw on the focus rods, which run the entire length of the box.

    For framing up the image when printing, I can view the ground glass through the rear door. I plan on making a collapsible bracket that attaches to the camera base.

    I've already done some experiments with printing, using my Speed Graphic, and I'll being using multigrade luster finish RC paper with contrast printing filters.

    8 by 10 is a bit large. I'm already thinking about a different box layout for 4 by 5, that's taller than it is long, with three vertically oriented chemical tanks in the bottom, along with two vertical paper safe boxes. The mid section of the box will be open space for manipulating paper, and for the arm sleeve, while the upper section will have the camera.

    I also am not seeing real need for development by inspection, providing the developer is fresh and near normal temperature.

    I might add that this series of images this week were done without inspection, as I wanted to eliminate leaks from the viewing port as an issue. What I am doing is varying the development time based on temperature and chemical freshness. A future box design might dispense with the inspection device altogether.

    ~Joe
    Last edited by JoeVanCleave; 04-01-2015 at 11:23 PM.
    "There was just that moment and now there's this moment and in between there is nothing. Photography, in a way, is the negation of chronology."-Geoff Dyer, "The Ongoing Moment"
    My Writing Blog: Joe Van Cleave's Blog
    My Pinhole Blog: Obscure Camera
    Visit my F295 Gallery

  7. #27
    This morning I finished building the optical printing frame, a wooden extension that bolts to the underside of the support base, which carries an upright sliding plate whose front surface is covered in a rubber magnet sheet, such that a paper negative can be mounted magnetically in front of the lens.

    P1100014a by jvcabacus, on Flickr

    P1100013a by jvcabacus, on Flickr

    And here's a scan of a finished print of the negative seen in the above shot. I'm pleased with the tones, as it very much resembles the kind of prints I've seen online from camara minutera photographers in Argentina, where the subject's face has nice tones, floating in an otherwise over-exposed background. Many such prints also seem to be masked with an oval border, which I'm thinking of employing with an oval mask made from a rubber sheet magnet. The original negative was f/22 for 3 seconds (he did a great job of holding steady and not blinking), while the print was f/8 for 10 seconds. This print was made on Ilford's multigrade warmtone resin coated pearl finish paper, rated at ISO 0.8 plus 1.6 stops, due to use of a grade 5 contrast filter behind the camera lens.

    Noah003a by jvcabacus, on Flickr

    (The strange blotchiness to the right was an artifact on the negative from residual chemicals on my fingers while handling the paper, something I'm going to need to be more careful about.)

    ~Joe
    "There was just that moment and now there's this moment and in between there is nothing. Photography, in a way, is the negation of chronology."-Geoff Dyer, "The Ongoing Moment"
    My Writing Blog: Joe Van Cleave's Blog
    My Pinhole Blog: Obscure Camera
    Visit my F295 Gallery

  8. #28
    Great proof of process print Joe! Know you are having a blast.Keep up the good work and keep pictures coming please.
    Don

  9. #29
    500+ Posts Ned.Lewis's Avatar
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    What Don said! You could have a set of choices of magnetic sheet masks... very cool!
    Some photos: Ipernity
    ( pinholes and solargraphs mixed in among the rest)

  10. #30
    I just finished part 1 of a two-part video on the Instant Box Camera.



    ~Joe
    "There was just that moment and now there's this moment and in between there is nothing. Photography, in a way, is the negation of chronology."-Geoff Dyer, "The Ongoing Moment"
    My Writing Blog: Joe Van Cleave's Blog
    My Pinhole Blog: Obscure Camera
    Visit my F295 Gallery

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