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Thread: camping image from this weekend

  1. #1
    500+ Posts earlj's Avatar
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    camping image from this weekend

    8x10 plywood camera Efke PL-100
    f250
    one hour forty five minutes
    scanned from the negative

    FatherHennepin001.jpg
    because:
    "a squid eating dough in a polyethylene bag is fast and bulbous, got me?"
    -Don Van Vliet

  2. #2
    Cool image Earl. I really like the streaks of light and shadow across the trail.

  3. #3
    500+ Posts earlj's Avatar
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    One must not forget that any pinhole image (and any photographic image, for that matter) does not show what a human viewer observed. The light was dappled. The trunks were partially lit. During the exposure, the dappling varied. No person ever saw what we see here. Likewise, with any photograph, no person saw what is displayed. Many people forget this . . . . . .
    because:
    "a squid eating dough in a polyethylene bag is fast and bulbous, got me?"
    -Don Van Vliet

  4. #4
    500+ Posts Ned.Lewis's Avatar
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    Yes! I love long exposure pinholes among trees when the light is changing. The part I like most is how the light looks between the trees.. it makes wonderful patterns and emphasizes that the light and forest is not static... and feels more alive and dynamic than "capturing an instant in time".. more like capturing the feel of the forest. Very nice!
    Some photos: Ipernity
    ( pinholes and solargraphs mixed in among the rest)

  5. #5
    Wow! Earl still another great image,well done.Keep'em coming
    Don.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by earlj View Post
    One must not forget that any pinhole image (and any photographic image, for that matter) does not show what a human viewer observed. The light was dappled. The trunks were partially lit. During the exposure, the dappling varied. No person ever saw what we see here. Likewise, with any photograph, no person saw what is displayed. Many people forget this . . . . . .
    So true. The smooth gradation of tones is wonderful. Between the movement of the light and leaves in the trees you have an all natural dodge and burn program.....
    "Most people know the names of only two photographers. One is Ansel Adams and the other one isn't." Bill Jay
    See Tales from the Dark Slide in the Gallery section.

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