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Thread: Building an anamorphic pinhole camera...

  1. #21

    Building an anamorphic pinhole camera...

    Yes, I used monochrome and for the moment, I think I'll stick to it because I can develop it myself and it's faster that way (no pro-lab close to home). But for sure I'll give color a try too (once I'm sure the camera can actually take pictures).

    I'm going to install Pinhole Designer too. That will be really useful. I was also thinking of making my own exposure charts, including reciprocity failure for various films I'll be using. That would make the process easier while on the go.

    Looks like I'd better make my camera take 35mm film too if I want to bracket. Otherwise, with just 4 exposures per film, I'll have to carry a large collection of rolls.

  2. #22

    Building an anamorphic pinhole camera...

    stick to whatever you're happy with...

    but FYI, pretty much every minilab that does 35mm colour film is capable of processing colour 120 roll film, so long as the owner bothered to get some basic attachments to carry the film. The one I use gives me a 20 minute turn around time which is about right for having coffee. They wouldn't be able to print the long pano format negs but you can scan them if you have a reasonable scanner. I have a fairly mundane flat bed scanner that can cope with this and then I just work with the digital files. I find this a lot easier than working with chemicals.

    Now Daryl will think I'm an atheist as well as a heretic! I'd rather be an iconoclast but I'm too dim.

    regards bracketing, I'd only do it a couple of times to just work out how your film behaves re reciprocity failure in your camera and once you've nailed it you'd just go to the correct exposure because you'd know what it will be

  3. #23

    Building an anamorphic pinhole camera...

    Hi!

    I could check whether there is a minilab in my neighborhood kind enough to be willing to develop my color 120 film. I had B&W last time I think. No quite sure anymore. Thanks for the tip!

    I have a question for Steven (if he still reads this thread). I tried to get my camera accept 35mm film with some film-guide extensions and various support bits. Everything went well until I got stuck with the 35mm canister.

    My problem is as follows. I can get the film out of a full canister by pulling on it. I can get the film back in by turning the axis of the canister. But there is no way I can get the film out of the canister by solely turning the axis the other way round. If I simply keep pulling the film in camera (just like a normal 35mm camera would do), I dislodge my film guides. I also considered loading the whole 35mm film on a 120 take-up spool and just use the canister as storage for the just exposed film. However, this would imply loading the film in the dark (or in a changing bag) and since film loading is quite tricky in this case, I'm not sure it's going to work.

    With your camera (http://f295.f295.org/uploads/Blah.pl?b-cm/m-1139688507/s-new/), you seem to be using two film canisters. You mentioned a "backwards take-up canister". Could you give more details on that part? That will surely help me with my problem!

  4. #24
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    Building an anamorphic pinhole camera...

    I am going to jump in, even though your question is addressed to Steven. You can buy empty 35 mm cannisters that come apart easily at most stores that sell darkroom supplies. You use one of these for the take-up reel by putting it into the camera 'upside down' as long as you space the two cannisters so the film path is straight.

    Another method requires the darkroom - pull the film all the way out of the 35 mm cannister and tape it to a used 120 backing paper and then wind it back on to the 120 spool. You don't have to do any camera modification at all this way.

  5. #25

    Building an anamorphic pinhole camera...

    earl's second point there hadn't occurred to me...
    rolling your 35mm film with the 120 backing would get image right over the full width of the film because there's no obstruction to light, and that will give you the option to make very groovy scans with the sprocket holes surrounded by image.
    whereas, if you make the 35mm film track over any sort of guide you'll lose image behind where the guides are
    good thinking earl

  6. #26
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    Building an anamorphic pinhole camera...

    Quote Originally Posted by apn
    whereas, if you make the 35mm film track over any sort of guide you'll lose image behind where the guides are
    good thinking earl
    I can't take credit. I think that I first heard about this technique more than a year ago on taco's website. I was reminded of it when I saw Marv's (or was it Ralph's) shots with the sprocket holes over on the pinhole side.

  7. #27

    Building an anamorphic pinhole camera...

    sorry, ilona- i've been out of town for several days. if you want sprocket holes (at the expense of a little bother) earl's description should get you there. what i do with that camera, because no darkroom is needed, is this:
    walgreens or other 1-hour processor will probably give you a handful of canisters with the leader hanging out- they normally toss them. i then tape that leader to the leader on the new roll. in order to have both winding stems pointed upwards, the take-up canister is inverted, and the film spliced emulsion-side to non-emulsion with scotch tape.

    i advance the film with a winding crank pulled out of a junk store plastic camera, then move it to the other stem to rewind.

    a few tips: tape both sides of the splice for strength. wind the film onto the take-up cassette past the splice before loading to make sure it doesn't snag. i drop the cassettes/canisters into chambers made from short lengths of plastic pipe with a wide (1/4") slot cutout for the film, which has had the sharp edges rounded over. the top plate is cut from the malleable plastic boxes dvds come in, with the holes drilled to the exact size of the stems, so no lightproofing is needed.

  8. #28

    Building an anamorphic pinhole camera...

    Hi!

    No problem, I've been out of town too.

    Thanks to Earl and Steven for the valuable tips!
    I'm going to try both methods in turn I think. I collected the paper from two rolls of 120 film already. I'm thinking of using two paper layers because I'm not sure one layer will be strong enough to slide against the film guide without problem. I'm a bit concerned about the film falling slightly as it will have no support but we'll see. Pinhole photography is not about accuracy ;D.

    The next step is to shoot a roll of 35mm film, develop it myself and get a canister for my experiments! (Can't get it at my local mini-labs...)

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